March 24, 2015

Guest Lecturer Post: Songs of the Sea

Songssea1Terry Bishop, a frequent guest lecturer with Oceania Cruises and man of many worlds, has had a lifelong love affair with global history and discovery which has taken him on adventures around the world. He now lives with his wife Julie in Andalusia, Spain, and often serves as guide in the nearby Sierras de Tejeda. Also an accomplished folk musician and entertainer, Terry looks forward to sharing his many passions with you during his upcoming lectures and performances during our Polynesian Treasures voyage aboard Insignia this June. Below, he shares a sneak preview of his “Songs of the Sea” presentation: stories and songs about the great sailors – Nelson, Cook, Bligh and Franklin – at work, rest and war. As he says, it’s less of a lecture, and more of a show!

Anchors aweigh, anchors aweigh,

Away, away,

We’ll sail the ocean blue.

This could be the theme song of many a ‘cruiser’ as they set off on another, or maybe their first, trip with Oceania Cruises. But the sailors who sang this type of song were not going to enjoy the benefits of 21st-century travel – with its personalized service, luxury accommodations and little to worry about except what and how much to pack! That sailors in their very basic wooden-walled square riggers could find the enthusiasm to create songs and make music is in itself a wonder.  “Anchors Aweigh” heralds the departure of that great explorer Captain James Cook, heading for the South Sea:

We’ll sail Endeavour southwards and sniff the tropic air

We’ll sail her to Tahiti and coral islands fair

And he would take with him his trusty crew, the men who knew the hard life back home, a life centered on survival, alcohol and women! 

As I was a walking up London, from Wapping to the Ratcliffe Highway

I chanced to pop into a gin-shop, to spend a long night and a day

And invariably trouble would result and then turned into a song to sing during the rare periods of free time on a ship heading who-knows-where, with no promise of a happy return.

Songsea2

Meanwhile, Admiral Lord Nelson battled his way to public recognition through his brilliant victories at the Nile, Copenhagen and finally to his tragic triumph at Trafalgar:

But my love was slain with Nelson, all on that very day,

At the cost of life and limb to many a loyal sailor:

But now he’s got no legs at all, for he ran a race with a cannon ball

And then, John Franklin took two vessels to explore the Northwest Passage in 1845. He lost his ships, his crew and his life, rued by his loyal wife Jane: 

Ten thousand pounds would I freely give, to see my Lord Franklin again

Shanties, gigs and reels would keep the crews exercised through many a dark day and create stories that live to this day. One time pop idol, David Essex created the musical Mutiny that closes with the Bounty’s Fletcher Christian’s melancholic air:

 I’ll go no more a-roving.

Whaling, warfare, trade and exploration were all part of the musical world of seafarers, with an optimistic view of their final resting place. 

And I’ll see you one day in Fiddlers Green!

Join Terry this June aboard Insignia for what is certain to be an engaging and entertaining show! 

March 20, 2015

Top UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Asia

Home to a legacy of ancient civilizations, a rich cultural heritage and diverse landscapes, Asia features over 200 UNESCO World Heritage Sites. From architectural wonders to spectacular natural treasures, our voyages take you to some of the most legendary and impressive sights in this unique region. Discover some of our favorite UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Asia that you can visit in 2015!

The Great WallThe Great Wall (available from Shanghai):
Truly amazing in its scope, the Great Wall of China stretches over 5,500 miles east to west across northern China. A stunning engineering marvel and a feat of human ingenuity, it carves a massive serpentine path along the crests of craggy mountainous terrain. The wall once formed a remarkable defense system against invasions from the north, and today offers astonishing views of the surrounding landscape. Walk along a preserved section of the wall, and take in awe-inspiring mountain vistas.

Angkor Wat ExperienceAngkor Wat Experience (available from Bangkok):                              

The spectacular temples of Angkor are spread throughout the jungles around Cambodia’s Siem Reap. The crowning masterpiece is the enormous, pyramid-shaped Angkor Wat, which bears numerous beautifully executed bas-relief carvings. Obscured by dense vegetation for hundreds of years, it wasn’t until the early 20th century that scholars began to unravel some of Angkor’s mysteries. Explore the intriguing temples throughout Angkor and enjoy a memorable sunset in this magnificent setting.

Ha Long Bay: Mythical Dragon’s BayHa Long Bay: Mythical Dragon’s Bay (available from Hanoi):

Named for a mythical dragon that defended the Vietnamese against invasion, Ha Long Bay is a scenic marvel of nearly 2,000 picturesque islands and precipitous limestone karsts that rise from the sea. The region is also home to rare and endemic flora and fauna species. According to legend, a family of dragons created this spectacle by spitting out jewels that turned into the islands dotting the bay, so as to protect against seafaring invaders. In a traditional junk, cruise among the magnificent limestone pillars, sheer cliffs and tranquil coves.

Taj MahalTaj Mahal (available from Mumbai):
Considered to be the finest example of Mughal architecture, Agra’s fabled Taj Mahal is a glistening mass of white marble and semi-precious stones set amid impeccably landscaped grounds. A monument of love built by the Mughal emperor in memory of his favorite wife, the glistening white marble Taj Mahal is a stunning masterpiece of Muslim art of truly massive proportions. One of the most renowned structures in the world, Agra’s fabled Taj Mahal will awe your senses and leave you with unforgettable memories.


Ancient Temples of BaganAncient Temples of Bagan (available from Rangoon):  

While not on the official UNESCO World Heritage Site list yet, we’ve included the ancient temples of Bagan since they are on the tentative UNESCO list – and visiting Bagan makes for a truly unparalleled travel experience. It is one of the richest archaeological sites in Asia and an astounding architectural marvel. Home to more than 2,000 religious shrines, you will be awed by the details of each masterpiece. Visit the Ananda Temple, the Gubyaukgyi Temple and the Dhammayangyi Temple, the most massive in Bagan. A walk amongst the well-preserved temples and vast ruins is an experience of a lifetime.

March 11, 2015

Discover the History and Grandeur of Scandinavia & Russia

Baltic1The Baltic region has many faces, and you will find new joys and unexpected delights in each one. The romance of Copenhagen is found in not only its meandering canals but also its centuries-old palaces, including the setting for Shakespeare’s Hamlet, a grand castle just north of the city. Riga’s reputation may be intertwined with that of the former Soviet Union, but as a historic Latvian city, it has become one of Northern Europe’s crown jewels.

Baltic3Even the most passionate art lover is astonished to discover a collection that is truly transcendent. With millions of pieces spanning both millennia and continents, St. Petersburg’s Hermitage can be described no other way. The low afternoon light reflecting off the gilt outline of an ornate chandelier is just as mesmerizing as the brilliant works of Rembrandt, Renoir and Monet hanging on the walls. History buffs will be astounded at how Scandinavia seems to manipulate the passage of time.

Baltic2In venerable Stockholm, the changing of the guard at the Royal Palace in Gamla Stan takes place just as it has for generations. The dramatic orchestral crescendos during a Russian ballet bring time to a standstill. As your fingertips touch the hard concrete of a preserved section of the Berlin Wall, it might seem as if all the stories of the Cold War come to life.

Some of the most pleasant surprises in Scandinavia cannot be experienced with your eyes, such as caviar and vodka at a café on Senate Square in Helsinki. The sounds of folk music on the streets in Gdansk or the scent of blue cornflowers in the gardens of a Baroque palace in Tallinn are unexpected moments that seem as if they were created only for you. A voyage with Oceania Cruises lets you discover all of the Baltic’s hidden treasures, because Scandinavia is best explored by the sea as the Vikings once did.

March 9, 2015

On Top of Italy with a Glass of Red Wine

While Riviera was docked in Taormina (Sicily), Italy, Blair and Titus S., avid cruisers and wine connoisseurs from Georgia, discovered striking Mount Etna and the Vineyards of San Michele Estate.

On Top of Italy with a Glass of Red WineOne thing we love about cruising is taking an ordinary day and turning it into something perfectly extraordinary.

That’s what happened on our Enchanting Riviera voyage from Athens to Monte Carlo last fall. I remember it was a Sunday. We were sitting next to a window at the San Michele Estate, enjoying course after course of delicious traditional Sicilian cuisine paired with an exquisite bottle of Pinot Noir. The Sicilian coast was to our left, Mount Etna straight ahead and a vast sea of bountiful vineyards surrounded us; I couldn’t help but wish for this to be my lunch view every day.  

The Sunday began with exploring Crateri Silvestri on top of glorious Mount Etna on a cool fall morning. At more than 10,000 feet, Mount Etna is the tallest of Italy’s mountains south of the Alps. There were so many cones, craters and lava streams our tour guide showed us. Pictures just can’t do the excursion justice, though we took many. For us, it was exciting to just walk around a stratovolcano together—something extraordinary that we've never done before.

     On Top of Italy with a Glass of Red Wine  On Top of Italy with a Glass of Red Wine

     On Top of Italy with a Glass of Red Wine  On Top of Italy with a Glass of Red Wine

     On Top of Italy with a Glass of Red Wine  On Top of Italy with a Glass of Red Wine

After exploring, we drove to San Michele Estate for a wonderful tour of one of our favorite wineries. We learned how Mount Etna’s soil helps make it a great region for wine production because it’s rich in potassium and mineral salts. We watched wine bottle labels being produced, which was also interesting as I never realized the bottle labels were made at the winery. Of course the best part of touring any winery is the opportunity to sample different varietals produced in the vineyard. We tasted at least five different wines and were not disappointed— I loved the Cabernet Sauvignon Murgo   

     On Top of Italy with a Glass of Red Wine  On Top of Italy with a Glass of Red Wine

     On Top of Italy with a Glass of Red Wine  On Top of Italy with a Glass of Red Wine

     On Top of Italy with a Glass of Red Wine  On Top of Italy with a Glass of Red Wine

We took home two bottles of wine from San Michele on that Sunday, though I wish there was a way to also take that incomparable lunch view back to Georgia. One thing is for sure, we’re looking forward to turning ordinary days into extraordinary ones on our next voyage! 

March 6, 2015

Saxman Native Village: History through Totem Poles

Books tell a story, carvings on a wall tell a story, and in Saxman Native Village in Ketchikan, Alaska, totem poles tell a story documented by the early Native Americans.  

Saxman Native Village: History through Totem PolesThough totem poles  are  prevalent  throughout southwest Alaska, Saxman Native Village is known for having the largest collection of standing totem poles. These were first created by local Native Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian artists (the three main indigenous groups in the Ketchikan Indian Community), who brilliantly carved symbols into red cedar logs from the Tongass Rainforest. 

Those symbols illustrated on the totem poles included  animals and mythological creatures that were believed to have spiritual significance. They watch over the families, clans and tribes of those who observe the belief of Totemism.  The symbols  represent clans, with the two most prominent clans belonging to the eagle and raven.  While the raven is represented by a straight beak, the eagle has a curved one. 

Saxman Native Village: History through Totem PolesEagle and Raven Symbolism

Eagle: The eagle is seen as an intelligent and resourceful animal. Many believe the eagle to be the  ruler of the sky because it can  soar higher than other birds. Their feathers are even considered sacred among many tribes. The eagle is seen as a divine spirit, representing  sacrifice, intelligence, renewal, courage, illumination of spirit, healing, creation, freedom, and risk-taking. The eagle is a powerful symbol of prestige, and also denotes peace and friendship. Many ancient tribes also believed the bird could transform into a human. 

Raven: Despite being perceived as corrupt and hungry, the raven is one of the most commonly used symbols in Alaska, and is the subject of more than 90 stories carved on totem poles. One of which explains the origins of the sun and moon. The Tlingit tradition tells how, long ago, the world was covered in darkness:  

Saxman Native Village: History through Totem Poles“Raven grew tired of stumbling around and went in search of light. As he came near the house of an old chief, he overheard the chief talking with his daughter. Raven learned that the chief kept all the light of the world locked away in a box.” This is when Raven planned to steal that box.  He transformed himself into a hemlock needle and landed in the river. It was then when the chief’s daughter unknowingly drank him and became pregnant. She later gave birth to a son — Raven’s human form.

The chief loved his new grandson and would have done anything for him. One day, Raven saw the box and begged to play with it. The chief refused, but as any kid would do, he cried, screamed, and even threw tantrums.  Eventually, the chief gave him the box, even though it was the one thing he did not want to share.

Raven instantly changed back to his bird form, carried the box through the  smoke hole inside the house, and placed the light in the sky as the sun, the moon and the stars. 

Experience Ketchikan

Explore the rich living culture of southeast Alaska's Native Americans, where more than a sixth of the city’s population is Alaskan native or American Indian.

Discover all about Ketchikan’s fascinating totem pole history on Regatta’s Majesty of Alaska voyage, or one of our other exciting Alaska voyages this summer. 

Saxman Native Village: History through Totem Poles Alaska9 Saxman Native Village: History through Totem Poles Saxman Native Village: History through Totem Poles